Part-time bureaucrat wastes time on the internet
due South and associated hot Canadian actors help me to do this!
posted 1 hour ago + 1,348 notes — via drjules64, © posthawk

posthawk:

Vivre Sa Vie (1962), dir. Jean-Luc Godard

#anna karina #I'm already grown up #and I don't look like her #dammit


posted 3 hours ago + 26 notes — via drjules64, © kill-me-mickey
kill-me-mickey:

Lumberjacks

kill-me-mickey:

Lumberjacks

#rock on down in unironic lumberjack style!


posted 8 hours ago + 362 notes — via missionlameturtle, © k115987

k115987:

Today Hard Core Logo made my day…

oh god i think i need to go and lie down

#callum keith rennie #hormonally devastating


posted 8 hours ago + 4 notes
You are a rolemodel for all of us.

I try my best to be a positive example for all the young people on the internet. I really do try my best.

And if that means crowdsourcing pornographic fanfic scenarios in my pyjamas, well, so be it. 

#seascribe #thank you to everyone who contributed to the discussion #you all helped me immesurably


posted 8 hours ago + 8 notes

Things I have done today:

Things I have not done today:

Today is a good day.

#look at your life #look at your choices #it's only 3.20pm #I still might go out #but then again i might not #i already feel a genuine sense of achievement #from finishing my first draft #and a first draft of my 20th anniversary story too #when did writing fanfic start feeling like purposeful activity?


posted 14 hours ago + 8 notes — via wagnetic

wagnetic:

After further fic research, I have learned that there are wrist cuffs, which are much better for not hurting your wrists, there are handcuffs which are really good for hurting your wrists, and there are handcuffs covered in fake fur that are just too fucking silly for this world. How do you possibly use those without cracking up? They’re so damn silly!

Anything goes for this challenge! Scarves, rope, lanyard; restraint real or symbolic - whatever you like! Handcuffs are the inspiration but don’t have to be taken at all literally - I called it a handcuffs fest rather than “bondage” because of all the great fanfic tropes involving handcuffs that pave the way to porn rather than jumping right in at the porn, so it would be hopefully more accessible to people who don’t want to write sex.

So go wild! Or don’t go wild at all! Write something vanilla and domestic! Or where handcuffs are used for proper law enforcement criminal-arresting purposes! I can’t wait to see what everyone comes up with!

Edit: I realise this response looks like a total non sequitur without @wagnetic’s tags asking about the admissibility of other form of restraint, which I cannot copy and paste from my phone. But according to William Shatner on twitter, today is non sequitur day so I’m gonna roll with it.
#paul gross birthday handcuffs fest #I can't remember my tag for this #the prospect of paul gross in handcuffs #is detrimental to the information management side of my brain


posted 15 hours ago + 2,219 notes — via wagnetic, © psych2go
jackymedan:

psych2go:

Wearing red makes a person appear more sexually appealing. ~ submitted by voicelessprospit 


Does it now?

jackymedan:

psych2go:

Wearing red makes a person appear more sexually appealing. ~ submitted by voicelessprospit 

Does it now?

#paul gross is sexually appealing whatever he wears #its a problem


posted 15 hours ago + 135 notes — via missionlameturtle, © 500px.com
missionlameturtle:

wagnetic:

jackymedan:

ponderation:

The Line by Christian Bothner 

Is it a warm line?

That’s exactly what I thought.

well the land around it certainly looks wide and savage…

missionlameturtle:

wagnetic:

jackymedan:

ponderation:

The Line by Christian Bothner

Is it a warm line?

That’s exactly what I thought.

well the land around it certainly looks wide and savage…

#I love everybody in this bar


posted 15 hours ago + 27 notes — via flatulenceofthesoul, © fuckyeahpaulgross
flatulenceofthesoul:

fuckyeahpaulgross:

Paul Gross on Madness and the Creative Process
Brad Wheeler for the Globe and Mail Fri April 18th 2014
Stratford Festival’s second annual Shakespeare Slam includes a one-man cabaret-rock performance by Hawsley Workman, but the main event is a debate inspired by the theme of this year’s festival, Madness: Minds Pushed to the Edge. Participants include academics, professionals and singer-songwriter Steven Page (who has suffered from depression) and actor Paul Gross (famed for his portrayal of a mentally overwrought artistic director in the miniseries Slings and Arrows). We spoke to the latter.
The subject of this year’s debate is whether or not madness is inherent in the artistic process. Who’s on which side?
Steven is arguing that madness is not required as part of the creative process. And I’m arguing that it is. Neither of us are in any position to comment with any certainty, and I don’t feel I’m an authority on mental illness per se. But I can talk about the creative process, which does have altered states involved in it. I’m actually not sure exactly what Steven’s argument is going to be. Just that I’m wrong, I’m sure.
Can you give us an idea of what your argument will be?
First, I would define madness as being slightly different from mental illness. I think madness is more closely aligned with shamanism or berserkers or oracles. I think most artists who are any good at their trade – and even those who aren’t – go into a kind of altered state where your proper self recedes to the background and you can receive creative inspiration. It goes back to as far as we can look, and it’s part of the process. But it’s manageable. Or, at its best, it should be managed so that you can enter the state, return from the state, and your consciousness comes back to the foreground and tries to make sense of what you’ve discovered.
Gord Downie has said that his goal as a songwriter is to get out of his own way. Is that the same as the altered state you’re talking about?
I think so. With the governor, the thing that controls you, you have to somehow put it in a closet for a little while, and then open it up and bring it back. I know that Kurt Vonnegut said the trick to writing, for him, was to get rid of his big brain. And yet, he does have to bring back that big brain to edit what he’s written. It’s being able to go in and out fluidly, and being able to call upon whatever you call the muse.
Getting into actual mental illnesses, what about the appeal of the so-called tortured artist?
Authenticity in an artist is what people respond to. But I think it’s a bit mixed up, and for few centuries there’s a been a romantic notion of the tortured artist. It can be difficult for audiences and artists to be able to separate a mental-health problem from inspiration. I don’t think they are aligned necessarily.
So, you’re not contending that artists with a mental illness have this weird reservoir of special inspiration or anything?
Right, that’s not what at all what I’ll be arguing for. But that an artist finds, and uses as a tool, states that are akin to mental illness.
Shakespeare Slam happens April 23, 8 p.m. $29 to $54. Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W., 416-408-0208, 1-800-567-1600 or tickets.rcmusic.ca.


yeah, madness should definitely not be confused with mental illness, but I must side with PG on this one, as in many other things.

flatulenceofthesoul:

fuckyeahpaulgross:

Paul Gross on Madness and the Creative Process

Brad Wheeler for the Globe and Mail Fri April 18th 2014

Stratford Festival’s second annual Shakespeare Slam includes a one-man cabaret-rock performance by Hawsley Workman, but the main event is a debate inspired by the theme of this year’s festival, Madness: Minds Pushed to the Edge. Participants include academics, professionals and singer-songwriter Steven Page (who has suffered from depression) and actor Paul Gross (famed for his portrayal of a mentally overwrought artistic director in the miniseries Slings and Arrows). We spoke to the latter.

The subject of this year’s debate is whether or not madness is inherent in the artistic process. Who’s on which side?

Steven is arguing that madness is not required as part of the creative process. And I’m arguing that it is. Neither of us are in any position to comment with any certainty, and I don’t feel I’m an authority on mental illness per se. But I can talk about the creative process, which does have altered states involved in it. I’m actually not sure exactly what Steven’s argument is going to be. Just that I’m wrong, I’m sure.

Can you give us an idea of what your argument will be?

First, I would define madness as being slightly different from mental illness. I think madness is more closely aligned with shamanism or berserkers or oracles. I think most artists who are any good at their trade – and even those who aren’t – go into a kind of altered state where your proper self recedes to the background and you can receive creative inspiration. It goes back to as far as we can look, and it’s part of the process. But it’s manageable. Or, at its best, it should be managed so that you can enter the state, return from the state, and your consciousness comes back to the foreground and tries to make sense of what you’ve discovered.

Gord Downie has said that his goal as a songwriter is to get out of his own way. Is that the same as the altered state you’re talking about?

I think so. With the governor, the thing that controls you, you have to somehow put it in a closet for a little while, and then open it up and bring it back. I know that Kurt Vonnegut said the trick to writing, for him, was to get rid of his big brain. And yet, he does have to bring back that big brain to edit what he’s written. It’s being able to go in and out fluidly, and being able to call upon whatever you call the muse.

Getting into actual mental illnesses, what about the appeal of the so-called tortured artist?

Authenticity in an artist is what people respond to. But I think it’s a bit mixed up, and for few centuries there’s a been a romantic notion of the tortured artist. It can be difficult for audiences and artists to be able to separate a mental-health problem from inspiration. I don’t think they are aligned necessarily.

So, you’re not contending that artists with a mental illness have this weird reservoir of special inspiration or anything?

Right, that’s not what at all what I’ll be arguing for. But that an artist finds, and uses as a tool, states that are akin to mental illness.

Shakespeare Slam happens April 23, 8 p.m. $29 to $54. Koerner Hall, 273 Bloor St. W., 416-408-0208, 1-800-567-1600 or tickets.rcmusic.ca.

yeah, madness should definitely not be confused with mental illness, but I must side with PG on this one, as in many other things.

#I really really really wish I lived in Canada #so I could see this #paul gross


posted 15 hours ago + 83,270 notes — via caralarm-bicycles, © futurefantastic

futurefantastic:

"bear with me," i say

i have a bear with me. i want everyone to know